Two on a Tower by Thomas Hardy

two-on-a-tower

RATING: 4.5/5

BLURB: “Hardy’s atmospheric, moving story of star-crossed lovers shows human beings at the mercy of forces far beyond their control, setting a tragic drama of human passion against a background of vast stellar space and scientific discovery. ‘Two on a Tower’ tells the story of Lady Constantine, who breaks all the rules of decorum when she falls in love with the beautiful youth Swithin St Cleeve, her social inferior and ten years her junior. Together, in an ancient monument converted into an astronomical observation tower, they create their own private universe – until the pressures of the outside world threaten to destroy it.”

REVIEW: Thomas Hardy has been my favourite author ever since I read what is now my favourite book, ‘Tess of the d’Urbervilles’, just over three years ago – consequently, I was greatly looking forward to reading ‘Two on a Tower’, one of Hardy’s lesser known works. The novel did not disappoint. The love affair that develops between Lady Viviette Constantine and Swithin St Cleeve is slow to develop, at least on his part, but this gives their love a greater realism than is seen in the majority of classic novels; the slow-burning nature of their affection also makes Viviette’s confession of love (and Swithin’s reciprocation) much more satisfying and exciting for the reader, as does the forbidden nature of their affair. Despite being a promising astronomer, Swithin is an orphan of low social rank with hardly a penny to his name, while Viviette is the neglected wife of an absent yet bullying Lord Constantine, making her the Lady of the parish. Socially, the two could not be more different, yet, a shared interest in astronomy brings them together in the most believable of ways. I was hugely impressed with Hardy’s knowledge of astronomy and astronomical terms, and loved how the movements of the stars and planets almost seemed to become characters themselves in the plotline, often reflecting the moods of the characters in hugely symbolic ways. Being of such different ranks and ages, however, means that the love that Swithin and Viviette share does not fail to undergo numerous hardships, even after their hasty, secret wedding in London. It is impossible to say more without ruining the novel, but it is safe to say that, as in the majority of Hardy’s works, there is no escape from tragedy for the star-crossed couple, and the ending had me in floods of tears. I would highly recommend this book to fans of Hardy, Victorian literature and romance. 

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