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Top Ten Books of 2017

This year has gone so quickly, and I can’t believe the time has come already for me to write up my Top Ten Books of 2017! I had a hard time narrowing them down this year, as I’ve been lucky enough to read some truly incredible books. I hope you enjoy reading this post – please let me know if any of these books have also made it into your top ten!

 

10. All the Rivers by Dorit Rabinyan

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“How do I describe him now? Where do I start? How do I distill the first impression created in those few distance seconds? How do I extract his finished portrait, composed of layer upon layer of color, back into the pale, hasty pencil sketch that my eyes drew the first time they landed on him? How can I use a mere few lines to paint the whole picture with all its breadth and depth? Is it even possible to attain that sort of scrutiny, that measure of lucidity, when the hands of loss keep touching the memory, staining it with their fingerprints?”

This is a beautiful and moving love story, looking at the ups and downs of a relationship that goes against the religious, political and social beliefs of both people within it. The ending had me in tears, and I couldn’t put the book down.

Read my full review of the book here.

 

9. Wintersong by S. Jae-Jones

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“There is music in your soul. A wild and untamed sort
of music that speaks to me. It defies all the rules and laws you humans set upon it. It grows from inside you, and I have a wish to set that music free.”

This is a truly magical novel, based on Christina Rossetti’s poem Goblin Market, that really captures the fantasy, lust and danger of the piece it is inspired on.

Read my full review of the novel here.

 

8. Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

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“Reading a novel was like returning to a once-beloved holiday destination.”

This became one of the most popular novels of the year after the gripping TV adaptation aired over the summer, starring Nicole Kidman, Reese Witherspoon and Shailene Woodley. The book, however, is even more full of twists and turns, capturing the reader with every page.

Read my full review of the book here.

 

7. The Loving Spirit by Daphne Du Maurier

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“The child destined to be a writer is vulnerable to every wind that blows. Now warm, now chill, next joyous, then despairing, the essence of his nature is to escape the atmosphere about him, no matter how stable, even loving. No ties, no binding chains, save those he forges for himself. Or so he thinks. But escape can be delusion, and what he is running from is not the enclosing world and its inhabitants, but his own inadequate self that fears to meet the demands which life makes upon it. Therefore create. Act God. Fashion men and women as Prometheus fashioned them from clay, and, by doing this, work out the unconscious strife within and be reconciled. While in others, imbued with a desire to mold, to instruct, to spread a message that will inspire the reader and so change his world, though the motive may be humane and even noble–many great works have done just this–the source is the same dissatisfaction, a yearning to escape.”

Daphne du Maurier is one of my favourite authors of all time, and I’ve spent much of this year collecting these beautiful editions of her books and trying to make my way through as many of them as possible. ‘The Loving Spirit’ is a brilliant novel, working its way through generations of the same family and showing how something as pure as a desire for adventure can be passed on over decades.

Read my full review of the novel here.

 

6. Romantic Outlaws by Charlotte Gordon

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“The real problem, said Mary, was not women, but how men wanted women to be.”

This is a fantastic joint biography of Mary Wollstonecraft and her daughter, Mary Shelley, looking at the parallels between their lives. Both women were geniuses of their time, Wollstonecraft as a philosopher and feminist and Shelley as the revolutionary writer of one of my favourite books, ‘Frankenstein’. This book is a thorough and fascinating explanation of these two extraordinary women, and well worth reading.

Read my full review of this biography here.

 

5. Jane Austen at Home by Lucy Worsley

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“Ah! There is nothing like staying at home, for real comfort.” – Jane Austen

This brilliant new biography of Jane Austen explores the life of the famous author through the places that she called home. Austen had many homes throughout her life, and each allows us to focus on a particular aspect or period of her life. This is the best biography of Austen I have read so far, and with her love of the home, I feel it is one she would approve of.

Read my full review of this biography here.

 

4. Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult

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“What if the puzzle of the world was a shape you didn’t fit into? And the only way to survive was to mutilate yourself, carve away your corners, sand yourself down, modify yourself to fit? How come we haven’t been able to change the puzzle instead?”

Picoult is another of my favourite authors, and this book is truly incredible. It deals with the stigma still attached to black people in the South of America today, and is truly shocking. It makes you think very deeply about your own views, and in true Picoult style presents a strong conflict between right and wrong.

Read my full review of the book here.

 

3. Milk and Honey/The Sun and her Flowers by Rupi Kaur

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“neither of us is happy/but neither of us wants to leave/so we keep breaking one another/and calling it love” – milk and honey

“i do not weep/because i’m unhappy/i weep because i have everything/yet i am unhappy”  – the sun and her flowers

I couldn’t possibly choose between these two incredible books by Rupi Kaur. I read ‘milk and honey’ for the first time this year, and bought ‘the sun and her flowers’ as soon as it was published in June. Both books address questions of feminity, masculinity, abuse, relationships, break ups, mental health and friendships, and are fantastically and beautifully written.

Read my review of ‘milk and honey’ here.

 

2. Home Going by Yaa Gyasi

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“We believe the one who has power. He is the one who gets to write the story. So when you study history, you must ask yourself, Whose story am I missing? Whose voice was suppressed so that this voice could come forth? Once you have figured that out, you must find that story too. From there you get a clearer, yet still imperfect, picture.”

This is an absolutely incredible book, and it was very hard to choose between this and the book I eventually chose for the top place. It tells the story of women and men through generations, beginning with two mothers and continuing with their descendants throughout time. The book is incredibly moving and thought-provoking; I cried more times than I can count, and put the book down feeling truly shaken and stunned.

Read my review of the book here.

 

1. The Hiding Places by Katherine Webb

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Katherine Webb has been in my Top Ten list, even previously in the top position, every year since I started this blog; 2017 was no exception. The release of her latest novel, ‘The Hiding Places’, was one I anticipated eagerly, and once I read the book I simply couldn’t put it down. It is beautifully written, with a fantastic twist, engaging characters and true talent. I absolutely loved this book, and am hoping for another Katherine Webb release in 2018!

Read my full review of this book here.

 

 

 

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The Potion Diaries by Amy Alward

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RATING: 3.5/5

BLURB: “When the Princess of Nova accidentally poisons herself with a love potion meant for her crush, she falls crown-over-heel in love with her own reflection. Oops. A nationwide hunt is called to find the cure, with competitors travelling the world for the rarest ingredients, deep in magical forests and frozen tundras, facing death at every turn. Enter Samantha Kemi – an ordinary girl with an extraordinary talent. Sam’s family were once the most respected alchemists in the kingdom, but they’ve fallen on hard times, and winning the hunt would save their reputation. But can Sam really compete with the dazzling powers of the ZoroAster megapharma company? And just how close is she willing to get to Zain Astee, her dashing enemy, in the meantime?”

REVIEW: I bought this book quite spontaneously from a seller on Depop as it sounded like it would be a nice, fun, fantasy read. It is indeed an easy novel to read, and cleverly combines realism writing within a fantasy setting. The protagonist, Samantha Kemi, is an ordinary but extremely gifted young woman in a world where people who are born Talented are instantly put above those who are ordinary, and where synthetic medicine companies have stolen away the power of the tradtional alchemists whom Samantha descends from. She stills helps to run the alchemist’s store belonging to her grandfather, and is a genius when it comes to mixing potions, with strong instincts and clever insights. When Princess Evelyn, who offers a few chapters in her own perspective throughout the novel, is poisoned  by her own love potion, the Wilde Hunt gives Sam the chance she needs to win some much needed cash and bring back the power of the notorious Kemi name. Synthetic medicine companies are also competing in the hunt, however – as is the King of Nova’s powerful exiled sister, Emilia, who will let no-one stand in her way. Sam finds herself increasingly in danger and under threat through the twists and turns of the hunt, ruthlessly pursued by Emilia due to her instinctual gift for working out which are the right ingredients. Her quest leads her across the globe with her family Finder, Kirsty, and also into the path of Zain Aster, a close friend of the Princess and heir to the synthetic ZoroAster pharmaceutical company. Despite her disagreement with synthetic potions, Sam finds herself drawn to Zain, and the two of them begin to develop feelings for each other as the Wilde hunt constantly throws them into each other’s paths.

I enjoyed the novel, particularly the quests for the different ingredients and the descriptions of the parts of the world that this took Sam and Kirsty to. I also felt that the developing relationship between Sam and Zain was written well and at a believeable pace. I did find the writing to be a little rushed in places, however, and also feel that there is not really a need to extend this book into a series, as is planned by the author – already there are two following installments. I liked the ending and feel that the story should perhaps have been left alone, rather than risk it becoming dragged out and predictable. It was, however, a light and easy read that was entertaining and introduced a fun new world.

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Closed Casket by Sophie Hannah

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RATING: 5/5

BLURB: “Lady Athelinda Playford has planned a house party at her mansion, but it is no ordinary gathering. She announces that she has decided to change her will, cutting off her children and leaving her fortune to someone who has only weeks to live…

Among Lady Playford’s guests are Belgian detective Hercule Poirot and Inspector Edward Catchpool of Scotland Yard, who have no idea why they’ve been invited…until Poirot starts to wonder if Lady Playford expects a murderer to strike. When the crime is committed, and the victim is not who Poirot thought it would be, will he be able to solve the mystery?”

REVIEW: I’ve always been a fan of Agatha Christie, particularly those stories led by Poirot, one of her most famous protagonists. I was keen to read these new takes on Christie’s original character, written by Sophie Hannah, after being recommended them by a friend. I was most certainly not disappointed; in fact, I was instantly captured by how Hannah seems to mirror Christie’s writing style so accurately, whilst also adding an additional flavour of her own particular style. The book was witty, offered an excellent social commentary on the class issues of the period, and captured the true essence of a traditional murder mystery. Mostly narrated by Inspector Edward Catchpool, an old associate of Poirot, this novel tells the story of famed children’s mystery author, Lady Athelinda Playford, who lives with children Harry and Claudia and their respective partners, Dorro and Randall. The household also contains a butler, maid and cook – and, most integral to the story, a young, unwell man named Joseph Scotcher who is a close friend of Lady Playford, accompanied by his nurse, Sophie. Alongside Poirot and Catchpool, Lady Playford also invites her lawyer friend, Michael Gathercole, and his associate Orville Rolfe, to stay at her home for the announcement of changes she has made to her will. Upon the announcement that she plans to leave all of her estate to Joseph, who is dying of a kidney disease, there is uproar among her family, and Poirot begins to expect that he and Catchpool have been invited to prevent a sinister event occuring. When Joseph is murdered later that evening, having just proposed marriage to his nurse, the events take a darker and more confusing turn. As the mystery deepens and the police get involved, making inept decisions at every turn, Poirot and Catchpool are left to work on their own intiative to uncover who, out of the many motives presented by Lady Playford’s guests and family, felt their motive deeply enough to murder an already dying man – and how they did so. I do not wish to reveal the ending of the story here, as the twist is cleverly done and thoroughly explained by the character of Poirot, but I was very impressed with the ending and, indeed, with the book as a whole. I am very keen to read Hannah’s other Christie-inspired work, ‘Monogram Murders’ – I’m hoping it will be waiting under my Christmas tree!

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Christmas Treats by Enid Blyton

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RATING: 5/5

BLURB: “Curl up with this collection of festive short stories by Enid Blyton. From the proud rocking horse who learns the gift of giving to a snowman befriended by elves, these joyful tales celebrate the true spirit of Christmas”

REVIEW: As previously mentioned, Enid Blyton was one of my favourite childhood authors, and reading her books as an adult feels like having a big hug from an old friend. I was really excited to settle down with this collection of her festive stories, and it definitely got me in the Christmas spirit! These stories are lovely little tales, complete with moral lessons, that would be a lovely thing to read to children over the Christmas period – or, indeed, to read yourself to remind you of the true meaning of Christmas! My particular favourites were ‘The Christmas Pudding that wouldn’t stop’, ‘The Fairies’ Christmas Party’ and ‘The Battle in the Toyshop’. I would highly recommend this book to children and adults alike!