Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

MOOE

RATING: 3.5/5

BLURB: “The Orient Express was unusually full for the time of year. Hercule Poirot sat in the elegant restaurant car and amused himself by observing his fellow passengers: A Russian princess of great ugliness, a haughty English colonel, an American with a strange glint in his eye…and many more. The food and company were most congenial and the little Belgian detective was looking forward to a pleasant journey.

But it was not to be. After a restless night, Poirot awoke to find that tragedy had struck. First, the train had been brought to a standstill by a huge snowdrift. Secondly, a passenger lay dead in his compartment, stabbed a dozen times, his door locked from the inside…”

REVIEW: I love a good murder mystery, and it amazes me that despite having seen any number of stage and screen adaptations of Agatha Christie novels, I had never actually read one until now. Many of the Christie screen adaptations were ones I binge watched with my Nan, so my Grandad purchased me the beautiful copy pictured above for my birthday this year as a sort of gift in rememberance of her. However, with a story as famous as ‘Murder on the Orient Express’, I had already broken my number one rule as a bookworm: I had seen the movie before reading the book. This is something I hate doing, but is even more frustrating considering the incredibly clever layers of mystery that Christie builds up throughout this novel, which should have made the ending of the mystery more of a shock to me. This did not mean, however, that I appreciated the intellignet intricacies of Christie’s writing any less, nor did it mean that I did not enjoy the novel, but unfortunately I do think it may have affected my overall enjoyment.

The novel is easy to get into and instantly intriguing; Hercule Poirot is a familiar character, well-known and likeable despite his rather pompous nature. His fun, witty and engaging nature makes him trustworthy to the reader even when we can sense his arrogance, a trait that is not normally endearing. I did find some parts of the novel slower than others, and also found the frequent use of French without translation somewhat frustrating, though in the time period in which Christie was writing more readers would probably have been able to translate this from their own education. I enjoyed the duplicity of the mystery with the clever weaving in of the Daisy Armstrong case, which eventually provided many of the answers to this particular mystery. Although knowing the ending meant that I was not held in suspense, I could appreciate the way in which the reader was held in suspense right up until the last minute. The mystery still provided a satisfactory conclusion for the reader, however; we felt sympathy for the murderer(s) and understand the motives, and therefore are glad of the ending which Poirot devises for them.

I would recommend this novel and am looking forward to reading further stories by Christie in the future.

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