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Heartless by Marissa Meyer

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RATING: 4.5/5

BLURB: “Long before Alice fell down the rabbit hole…and before the roses were painted red…The Queen of Hearts was just a girl, in love for the first time.”

REVIEW: I’ve been wanting to read this reimagining of the story of the Queen of Hearts for quite some time, and was really excited when I picked it up on my birthday book-shopping trip. This novel tells the story of Catherine, Lady Pinkerton, the future Queen of Hearts. In this version, however, Catherine is a very a likeable character; a young woman who wishes to run away from her life as a member of the nobility and use her exceptional talents to set up a bakery with her maid, Mary-Ann. This dream appears to be dashed, however, when Catherine discovers that the perfectly kind but extremely foolish King of Hearts wishes to ask for her hand in marriage, a fact which her parents are all too delighted by. Upon fleeing his initial proposal Catherine meets the King’s new court jester, Jest, a handsome and mysterious young man who captures Catherine’s interest at once. As the Kingdom begins to grow in fear after a series of Jabberwock attack and the King’s intentions grow increasingly serious despite her attempts to slow things down, Catherine’s dreams seem to be becoming an increasingly distant possibility. Her relationship with Jest develops throughout the novel in a way that draws the reader in at once and makes us desperate for the two to find a way to be together, removed from the world they know so that each of them can realise their dreams. It is difficult to write more of the plotline without giving away spoilers, but it is easy to see how Catherine developed into the infamous Queen of Hearts, a villainess we are familiar with from her many depictions in book and particularly in film. Even knowing what she will become and witnessing some of this transformation towards the end of the novel, the reader still sympathises with Catherine. I am really hoping that there will be a sequel to this novel, as it is definitely one of my favourite Wonderland-set novels that I have read, and I’m eager to find out what happens next now that Catherine is the Queen of Hearts.

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Splintered by A.G.Howard

Splintered

RATING: 3.5/5

BLURB: “Alyssa Gardner hears the thoughts of plants and animals. She hides her delusions for now, but she knows her fate: she will end up like her mother, in an institution. Madness has run in her family ever since her great-great-great grandmother Alice Liddell told Lewis Carroll her strange dreams, inspiring his classic Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

But perhaps she’s not mad. And perhaps Carroll’s stories aren’t as whimsical as they first seem.

To break the curse of insanity, Alyssa must go down the rabbit hole and right the wrongs of Wonderland, a place full of strange beings with dark agendas. Alyssa brings her real-world crush – the protective Jeb – with her, but once her journey begins, she’s torn between his solidity and the enchanting, dangerous magic of Morpheus, her guide to Wonderland.

But no-one in Wonderland is who they seem to be – not even Alyssa herself…”

REVIEW: I’m sure frequent readers of this blog have gathered by now that I enjoy retellings of classic stories and fairytales, and I have a large stack of Alice in Wonderland retellings ready to get through on my bookshelf. Splintered was one of these books. It tells the story of Alyssa Gardner, a bold young woman who finds herself isolated from most of her peers due to her ability to hear the words spoken by insects and plants. The only people she lets herself be close to are her father, who is still devoted to her mad mother, her best friend and work colleague Jen, and Jen’s older brother Jeb, who has always been protective towards Alyssa, but whom Alyssa has always wanted much more from. After an incident at the institution where her Mum lives, Alyssa finds a series of clues and objects linked to Wonderland which she believes will cure her mother’s madness. During an argument with Jeb, she accidentally lures him into Wonderland with her, plunging the two of them into great danger. Although the pair begin to learn much more about themselves and each other, leading them to confess their feelings for one another, things are complicated by Morpheus, Alyssa’s dangerous but attractive guide to Wonderland. As Alyssa completes an increasing number of tasks that we recognise as stemming from the original story – for example, her emptying of the Pool of Tears – she begins to uncover more and more secrets about her heritage, and finds a way to break the curse of madness that has plagued the women of her family ever since Alice Liddell.

This book was clever and imaginative, and the storyline was more unusual and different from many of the usual formulaic reproductions of the Alice story. There were some parts of the book that I simply enjoyed less than others; I loved the development of the relationship between Alyssa and Jeb, and the conflicting desires Alyssa felt for the two men in her life. There were some elements of Wonderland itself that I enjoyed less; for example, the moment when the flowers turned into zombie-like creatures and chased Alyssa and Jeb in an attempt to eat them. I can’t pinpoint what exactly about this book didn’t quite hit the spot for me, because I did enjoy it, and the writing style was good with vivid description. I am intrigued to see what the further books in this series have to offer for this tale.

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The Story of Alice by Robert Douglas Fairhurst

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RATING: 4.5/5

BLURB: “This is the secret history of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

Wonderland is part of our cultural heritage. But beneath the fairytale lies the complex history of the author and his subject. Charles Dodgson was a quiet academic but his second self, Lewis Carroll, was a storyteller, innovator and avid collector of ‘child-friends’. Carroll’s imagination was to give Alice Liddell, his ‘dream-child’, a fictional alter ego that would never let her grow up.

This is a biography that beautifully unravels the magic of Alice. It is a history of love and loss, innocence and ambiguity. It is the story of one man’s need to make a Wonderland in a changing world.”

REVIEW: I have wanted to read this book since its release, and was very excited to receive it for my birthday last month. I am a huge fan of Alice in Wonderland and have read the book and its sequel, Through the Looking Glass, many times. Although I knew a little, as many of do, about the story behind Carroll’s creation of this famous tale – his close friendship with a little girl named Alice Liddell, whom he one day took a boat ride with and, to amuse her, told her the story which would eventually become Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland – I learnt a great deal more through reading this biography. Douglas-Fairhurst writes beautifully, and the book reads almost like a novel itself, truly capturing the magic surrounding both the creation and dissemination of Alice. A great deal of time is spent discussing one of the great mysteries of Lewis Carroll; how close was he to Alice Liddell and the other little girls he befriended and photographed? As an amateur photographer, the majority of Carroll’s portraits involved young girls, many of them named Alice and some either nude or barely dressed. Douglas-Fairhurst discusses the problems this poses for us in the modern day, looking back on Carroll and his life; realistically, many of us might apply the term of paedophile to Carroll, in light of what we can see from his photographs and the letters he wrote to these young girls. However, Carroll – when he was busy being Charles Dodgson – was a reverend, a religious man, and often condemned those who viewed the purity and innocence of children through a ‘sinful’ eye. I would concur with the conclusion that Douglas-Fairhurst makes: that Carroll was, in fact, simply captivated by the innocence and beauty of youth, a period of life which he saw as carefree and creative. Carroll maintained a close relationship with children because he loved youth and wished to reconnect with his own lost years, and I think you can see that childish and youthful imagination shining through in both of the Alice books. I really enjoyed learning more about Carroll and the story behind the creation of Alice, and would highly recommend this book.

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Archenemy by Frank Beddor

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RATING: 3.5/5

BLURB: “The battle for Wonderland has come to a head. Imagination has been wiped from the land and even Queen Alyss has lost her powers. The Queendom hangs in the balance…”

REVIEW: Much like the previous book in the trilogy, ‘Seeing Redd’, I found that the finale of ‘The Looking Glass Wars’ series, ‘Archenemy’, often became tangled and complicated due to the amount of material that Beddor was attempting to deal with. This time, however, this only served to make the book even more gripping and exciting, leaving me with the certainty that Queen Alyss and the force of White Imagination would triumph, but with absolutely no idea of how they would get there. Alyss suffers so many setbacks in her attempts to restore Imagination to Wonderland, regain the Heart Crystal and reunite her torn and suffering kingdom, that we begin to wonder if she will ever actually get there. With King Arch’s takeover of Wonderland and Alyss’ unexpected alliance with her evil aunt Redd, things take an unexpected turn for the worse as Wonderland descends into chaos and anarchy, with some dissidents believing that the land would be more fair and equal if nobody possessed any Imagination at all. With the help of her trusted companions – Homburg Molly, Hatter Madigan, Bibwit Harte, General Doppelganger and, of course, her childhood sweetheart Dodge Anders, Alyss manages to restore Imagination and justice to the Kingdom – and, at the end of it all, is finally free to be with the man she loves. Beddor’s increased inclusion of our world and his incorporation of Alice Liddell into the story is even more cleverly done in this novel, I would argue, with our world seeming to reflect a much stabler and more simple way of life that the reader begins to long for. The series also reaches a satisfying conclusion, giving the reader the sense that everything has been put to rights. I did, however, find this book to be the most confusing and complex in the series, and sometimes the battle scenes became a little repetitive – this did not, however, ruin my enjoyment of the book or my enjoyment of the series as a whole.

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Seeing Redd by Frank Beddor

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RATING:3/5

BLURB: “Alyss of Wonderland’s rule has just begun, but the Queendom is already under threat. Someone is using the brutal Glass Eyes and attacking Wonderland on all sides. It can only mean one thing: the evil Redd Heart has returned…”

REVIEW: This second novel in Beddor’s Alice-in-Wonderland-inspired ‘The Looking Glass Wars’ trilogy was, I found, much more complex than the first. Rather than having one plot, it seemed to have several smaller sub-plots that combined together to make a gripping but also rather tangled story of Alyss’ first few months as Queen of Wonderland. Firstly, of course, is the story of Alyss trying to fit in with her role as Queen, learning once again to manipulate her powers of White Imagination, dealing with an unruly populace, and attempting to determine and control her feelings for the much-changed Dodge Anders. On the opposing side, however, is the tale of Redd Heart, who has retreated to our world and is attempting to build up her armed forces enough to take on Alyss, while also trying to complete her own unfinished Looking Glass Maze which, she believes, will make her far more powerful than Alyss. The introduction of a more personal story for Hatter Madigan was one that I really enjoyed, and I felt that it added an extra dimension to the novel, dealing with themes of love and sacrifice that make the novel far more touching. The addition of King Arch of the Boarderlands as a second enemy to Alyss and Wonderland was also inspired, making the novel even more full of conspiracy and treachery. This is a great follow-up to the first book, and I am really looking forward to reading the last book in the series!

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The Looking Glass Wars by Frank Beddor

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RATING: 4/5

BLURB: “You think you know the true story of Alice in Wonderland? Well think again. Alyss is destined to become Queen of Wonderland…until her parents are murdered. She flees to safety in our world. Years pass. Now it is time to return.”

REVIEW: I absolutely love twisted versions of fairytales (as long-term followers of this blog may by now have realised!) and was greatly looking forward to reading this trilogy. The first book in the series opens with the birthday party of the young heir to the throne, Princess Alyss Heart, a celebration that travels throughout Wonderland. However, the festivities are soon ruined by the invading forces of Alyss’ vindictive Aunt, Redd Heart, the sister of Queen Genevieve and, as she believes, the rightful heir to the throne of Wonderland. As both of her parents are murdered by Redd and her army, Alyss escapes with the head of the Millinery Army, Hatter Madigan, into the real world. Here Beddor cleverly links the story of Princess Alyss with the tale of Alice in Wonderland that we all know and love, as Alyss is adopted by the Liddell family and becomes the inspiration for a work of fiction written by Reverend Charles Dodgson (pename Lewis Carroll). She even catches the eye of the young Prince Leopold and is all set to marry him when she is abruptly returned to Wonderland by her childhood sweetheart, guardsman Dodge Anders. Thirteen years have passed in Wonderland since her disappearance, and Redd’s control over Wonderland is completely Totalitarian and fully established, sharing similarities with real dictatorships throughout history. From this point on a battle exists between Redd and the Alyssians, the resistance movement that has now rallied around Alyss, as Alyss tries to find the Looking Glass Maze –  a maze which, if she successfully navigates it, will make her powerful enough to destroy Redd and take back the throne of Wonderland. The book is brilliantly written, with links to all of our favourite characters from Lewis Carroll’s original tale. Beddor makes Wonderland a dark and mystical place that entrances the reader and grips them from the very first page. I have almost finished the second book in the trilogy and look forward to seeing how if it will conclude as well as this first book did!